Anti-Pope Joan

St Joan, pray for me. I want to be a Catholic but the Church won't let me.
Ask me anything

One of the genuine ironies of the internet is that as it’s grown unflinchingly, even militantly tolerant of race, orientation, taste, and fetish, tolerance has been fashioned into a weapon, to be used against itself. “God, who cares?” is a rote reaction among a certain sort of person when it’s announced that the hero of a game is a woman or black, or when an athlete comes out as gay, or when some other milestone is achieved. The idea is that we’re all so equal now that true intolerance begins with even noting that anyone is different from the norm, said norm of course being a young, straight, middle-class white guy. To get to this mindset requires a certain willful blindness to privilege and the ways it has embedded itself in the very structures of American life, which is how you wind up with people saying things like, “For some reason, some black people kind of hold onto the ‘back in the day,’ the slave thing, or they feel they’re not being treated right.” Cluelessness about institutional inequality isn’t a crime, but it’s a major contributing factor to the grand nerd myth of the internet as a perfect meritocracy in which everyone is equal and the worst crime is special pleading.

totallyamelia:

imightgetcynical:

totallyamelia:

Yeaaaahhh…

Marriage equality is cool and all, but uh…

Trickle down equality, yo!

bigbabycarolyn:

sadboosexual:

theyuniversity:

It’s good to know that we weren’t the only ones driven crazy by people who “axe” questions.

Okay, see, we talked about this linguisitic phenomenon in my grammar class. I don’t remember what it’s called, but it happens with other words, too - my professor used an example of “uncomfortable.” When you say it out loud, most likely, it sounds more like “un-comf-ter-ble,” thus mixing up the position of the r and the t, like how the k and the s are mixed in this speech pattern. However, not many people are out here acting high and mighty because someone said “uncomfterble” like they are with “ax,” and that has absolutely everything to do with academic biases - because “ax” is associated mostly with Black people (and occasionally lower-class whites), it’s viewed as “improper” speech, whereas most people, even middle & upper class white people who are thought to speak the most ~proper~ version of English, say “uncomfterble.”
And a quick Google search yields that even Chaucer used “axe” to mean “ask” within his writing. (Source) (Source)
tl;dr actually caring about whether someone says “ask” ~”correctly”~~ is rooted in racist & classist biases of language so, consider, not. 

^ 
Yes!! Mix up like these are not “incorrect” at all! For example, native english speakers insert sounds (strengths = strenKths), delete sounds (vegetables = VEGtable as opoosed to vegEtable), make sounds sound like other sounds (the n in input sounds like IMput), make sounds sound less like other sounds, and switch sounds around (ask/axe). Switching sounds around is called ‘metathsis’. None of these are incorrect ways of pronounciation v^-^v And calling others out when u know perfectly well what they mean is heavily rooted in, as sadboosexual explained, racist and classist biases of language!!

bigbabycarolyn:

sadboosexual:

theyuniversity:

It’s good to know that we weren’t the only ones driven crazy by people who “axe” questions.

Okay, see, we talked about this linguisitic phenomenon in my grammar class. I don’t remember what it’s called, but it happens with other words, too - my professor used an example of “uncomfortable.” When you say it out loud, most likely, it sounds more like “un-comf-ter-ble,” thus mixing up the position of the r and the t, like how the k and the s are mixed in this speech pattern. However, not many people are out here acting high and mighty because someone said “uncomfterble” like they are with “ax,” and that has absolutely everything to do with academic biases - because “ax” is associated mostly with Black people (and occasionally lower-class whites), it’s viewed as “improper” speech, whereas most people, even middle & upper class white people who are thought to speak the most ~proper~ version of English, say “uncomfterble.”

And a quick Google search yields that even Chaucer used “axe” to mean “ask” within his writing. (Source) (Source)

tl;dr actually caring about whether someone says “ask” ~”correctly”~~ is rooted in racist & classist biases of language so, consider, not. 

Yes!! Mix up like these are not “incorrect” at all! For example, native english speakers insert sounds (strengths = strenKths), delete sounds (vegetables = VEGtable as opoosed to vegEtable), make sounds sound like other sounds (the n in input sounds like IMput), make sounds sound less like other sounds, and switch sounds around (ask/axe). Switching sounds around is called ‘metathsis’. None of these are incorrect ways of pronounciation v^-^v And calling others out when u know perfectly well what they mean is heavily rooted in, as sadboosexual explained, racist and classist biases of language!!

When even the Radio Times is calling bullshit, you know you’ve got some major characterisation problems…

(source)

afro-dominicano:

socialjusticekoolaid:

Whites riot over pumpkins in NH and Twitter turns it into epic lesson about Ferguson, aka The Best of #PumpkinFest, PT 1. #staywoke

in this week’s episode of shit black folks would get murdered or jailed with no trial for

BREAKING: 40,000 Voter-Registration Applications Submitted by Blacks and Hispanics Disappear in Ga. 

madmaudlingoes:

talesofthestarshipregeneration:

liligiworld:

thepoliticalfreakshow:

It’s one thing to misplace your keys, your wallet, a receipt from Macy’s or your favorite pen, but Georgia’s secretary of state cannot account for approximately 40,000 voter-registration applications that, if processed, would enfranchise predominantly black and Hispanic Georgians.

According to an Al-Jazeera report, it’s a sentiment that the staffers at Third Sector Development are expressing. The nonprofit organization was on a mission to register as many black and Hispanic people in the state of Georgia as possible so that voter turnout for the upcoming midterm elections in November would be high. And they were successful at it, until they received word that about half of the applications they submitted for processing have gone missing in action.

“Over the last few months, the group submitted some 80,000 voter-registration forms to the Georgia secretary of state’s office—but as of last week, about half those new registrants, more than 40,000 Georgians, were still not listed on preliminary voter rolls. And there is no public record of those 40,000-plus applications, according to state Rep. Stacey Adams, a Democrat,” Al-Jazeera explained.

Georgia Secretary of State Brain Kemp explained that his office is not doing anything differently from how it usually processes applications. But some people aren’t buying his story, seeing as how he’s a Republican, and black and Hispanic people tend to vote for Democrats.

Georgia Republicans have been raising eyebrows for some time now with regard to early voting and voter-ID issues. One state Republican didn’t like how black and Hispanic voters had easy access to early-voting opportunities.

The “Republican whip of the state Senate complained that DeKalb County, Ga., was making it too easy for minorities to vote by allowing early voting in an area mall close to many predominantly African-American churches,” Think Progress reports.

Third Sector Development is not taking lightly the news that no one knows what became of its hard work to get people to register to vote. The group is going to court so that a judge can look into it.

“To that end, Third Sector Development announced yesterday that, after weeks of fruitless negotiations with the state, they were going to court to find out the status of the missing registrations—or, more to the point, the eligibility of more than 40,000 potential voters,” Al-Jazeera reports.

Read more at Al-Jazeera and Think Progress.  

Source: Diana Ozemebhoya Eromosele for The Root

Woooow. You see how they do??

ELECTION OBSERVERS FOR THE UNITED STATES PLEASE.

This happened at my undergrad—the county courthouse “lost” over a hundred registration cards that had been collected on campus, because they didn’t like the idea of students voting in local elections. But this to orders of magnitude more frightening.

(Source: marniethedog)

Lately, feminists like Annie Lennox, bell hooks and Emma Watson have taken issue with Beyoncé’s sexual openness. While trying to discredit Beyoncé as a feminist, they seem to have forgotten one of the most important parts of Chimamanda’s speech in ***Flawless.

"What does a lady dress like, exactly? And who decided what a lady looks like? What bearing should one’s clothing have on one’s identification as a feminist? This is exactly the kind of misogynist policing we’ve fought tooth and claw against for decades, and to level this line of “reasoning” at Beyoncé is not only antifeminist, it is despicable." (x)

(Source: thequeenbey)

Women hear it all the time from men. “You’re overreacting,” we tell them. “Don’t worry about it so much, you’re over-thinking it.” “Don’t be so sensitive.” “Don’t be crazy.” It’s a form of gaslighting — telling women that their feelings are just wrong, that they don’t have the right to feel the way that they do. Minimizing somebody else’s feelings is a way of controlling them. If they no longer trust their own feelings and instincts, they come to rely on someone else to tell them how they’re supposed to feel.
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